8 Reasons Why Sildenafil (Viagra) Didn’t Work For You

8 Reasons Why Sildenafil (Viagra) Didn’t Work For You

The Lowdown on Getting Tested for Erectile Dysfunction

If you’ve done any Google query about problems that might affect your penis, then you will have likely already heard of sildenafil or the little blue pill more commonly known by its brand name, Viagra.

And, if you’re at the point where you’re reading this sentence, then you might be concerned about what happens if it doesn’t seem to be as effective for you as it is for millions of other men.

You might have popped the blue pill only to find out it was literally and figuratively short of your expectations.

That’s fine — it happens.

Read on why you may have had a lackluster experience with sildenafil below — and what you can do right now to manage your ED despite the fact.

 

What is sildenafil (Viagra)?

Sildenafil is the generic name of Viagra, an oral medicine used to treat acute erectile dysfunction, or ED. It belongs to the PDE-5 inhibitor group of drugs, which work by inhibiting cGMP-specific PDE-5 (or phosphodiesterase type-5, for those of you keeping score). PDE-5 is the enzyme responsible for blood flowing OUT of the penis, causing an erection to deflate. Whenever PDE-5 enzymes are blocked, cGMP levels remain high, inducing vasodilation, where smooth muscles relax, and blood vessels open up. More blood flow to the penis means producing an erection.

Viagra is recommended to be taken a few to several hours before engaging in sexual activity, and remember that sildenafil doesn’t work unless you are in a state of physical arousal.

Nevertheless, while sildenafil has been proven to be an effective ED treatment, that doesn’t mean it’s going to work 100% the same for everyone — in fact, it’s normal for some men to claim that there is little to no difference at all since going on it. Here are eight reasons why.

 

Why didn’t sildenafil (Viagra) produce any effect on you?

  • Check if you’re taking the right dose. Sildenafil, Viagra, in particular, comes in 25, 50, and 100 mg doses. In general, the most prescribed beginner’s dose is 50 mg. Still, your doctor will prescribe the best one depending on your medical history, the current state of health, and any medicines/supplements you’re taking. You may need a higher dose. Ask your doctor before changing dosages, and don’t test on yourself. Consult a professional before switching dosages different from what your doctor first recommended.
  • You might have had a big or fat-heavy meal before taking sildenafil. Taking sildenafil on a full stomach may delay its absorption, therefore prolonging the time it takes to take effect. Therefore, if you’ve had a big meal before taking Viagra, you may feel its effects come on later than you may have first assumed, or less potent than you imagined, or went flaccid sooner than you wished. Likewise, that doesn’t necessarily mean you need to take sildenafil on an empty stomach; rather, you might want to opt to consume a lighter meal before taking it or by taking it earlier than you eat.
  • You might have drunk too much before taking it. Suffice to say, sildenafil (and its ilk) can’t cure ED arising from too many drinks hanging off your dick. Alcohol is a major depressant that affects the way your body produces an erection and the rest of your body’s systems. Therefore, avoid taking alcohol and recreational drugs that may worsen ED. Worse, chronic alcohol consumption may damage the internal organs like the heart, liver, and nerves while tanking your testosterone levels. All of these are contributing factors to ED.
  • You might have an untreated case of ED. ED can have many potential causes. They might be related to a serious underlying problem that can involve psychological health (such as anxiety and stress). More importantly, it can involve other serious health problems like cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Indeed, for younger adults, ED may be a hallmark sign of an underlying heart problem. When your doctor first prescribed sildenafil, you most likely discussed your entire medical history and current health situation. Further investigation may be required, as well as a follow-up visit.
  • You aren’t sexually aroused. Sildenafil only works if you’re feeling it. If you’ve tried Viagra once and you felt that the effects fell a little short of your expectation, you may simply be not turned on. You could be stressed, tried, or have something troubling your mind. It’s worth it to give things another shot.
  • You took it too early or didn’t give it enough time to work. Sildenafil is generally prescribed to be taken from 1-4 hours before engaging in sex. If you take it too early, its effectiveness may be impaired; therefore, it’s best to stick to the medicine’s ideal effectiveness timeframe.
  • You don’t get enough exercise. Living a sedentary lifestyle is a serious ED risk factor. A 2009 study that went on the Journal of Sexual Medicine demonstrated that men who were classified as inactive or fairly active (ranging from 30-150 minutes of physical activity every week) were 40-60% more likely to have ED as opposed to men who got 150 or more minutes of weekly physical exertion. The reason is that sildenafil works best when your body is at its healthiest, meaning it can boost blood flow throughout the extremities and body — penis included. Going on a regular exercise routine will be the best thing you can do to get your cardiovascular health back to speed.
  • You might need to take new medicine. It happens — sometimes, sildenafil (Viagra) is just not your cup of tea. If it isn’t, you may want to try other PDE-5 inhibitors like tadalafil or vardenafil (Cialis or Stendra, respectively) or adult toys like cock rings and penis pumps. For other men, injectable ED medication may be the solution (ex. alprostadil). There are many ways you can treat ED — you just need to find one that works for you.

 

Side effects of sildenafil (Viagra)

Viagra may have had you experience side effects that you found was less than your expectations. Common side effects might include headaches, gastrointestinal discomfort, indigestion, back pain, muscle pain, rashes, and a stuffy nose.

Uncommon side effects may include cardiovascular symptoms, eye impairments, hearing loss, tinnitus, swelling, or worse, priapism (or an extended erection that doesn’t subside).

If sildenafil doesn’t seem to work for you, don’t give up — there are plenty of alternative treatments you can pursue. Sometimes, all it takes is a little harder work than usual to get through the tough times. So ask your doctor about it.

 

Male UltraCore

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